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Google Plus Strategy, Blogging Success and Violinists Interruption

Posted: Wednesday, March 6, 2013 at 10:00:21 AM EST by
Welcome to our weekly
Link Round Up.

This week we have links
about Google+, Blogging,
the new Google Analytics,
What Australia has been
searching last year and a
fun video about a violinist
getting interupted by a
mobile phone ringing.

Please share your ideas
and links with us by
commenting below, we
would love to hear from you. 
 chameleon

The Most Imortant News - Why Every Marketer Now Needs a Google+ Strategy
If there was any question to whether or not Google+ was a serious player in the social circles (pun intended) I think it has been laid to bed.

7 Psychological Studies Reveal Secrets to Blogging Success
Blogging is an essential part of website ownership. Any help you can get is a bonus.

An Update on the New Version of Google Analytics
As they saying goes,"you manage what you measure".

Australia’s Top Searches 2011
An interesting insight to the search habbits of Australians

Violist Handles Cell Phone Interruption in the Best Way Possible
We could learn how to handle a bad situation from this violinist.


Stephen Hamilton is a Search Engine Marketing Consultant at SiteZero.

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Increase Your Marketing Results – Identify Your Target Audience

Posted: Friday, June 20, 2014 at 1:18:38 PM EST by Richard Norris

increasemarketing

Businesses that have a clear understanding of their target market have much more success in their marketing adventures than those businesses that don’t.


Without a known target market your business is wasting valuable resources.

I remember a science experiment I did way back in grade 7.  It was balloon rocket racing.  We blew up balloons with air, taped a straw to the balloon and threaded a string, that was attached to the wall on the other side of the classroom, through the straw.  Another team did the same on another piece of string, so on the count of three we let go of our balloons to see who would win.

Most of the teams joined two or three baloons and some even joined together four balloons in the hope of victory.  The more balloons the faster it will go.  This logic of 12 year olds is carried out by many business owners in their forties and fifties.  My team however, went for a simple method of just one balloon, and to our surprise we won.

The principle behind a successful balloon rocket is the same principal of successful marketing:  focused energy.

There was logic is having more than one balloon powering the rocket, but often logic and facts are different.  This is one of those instances.  The problem with having more than one balloon is that the air coming out is going in different directions; one balloon is going left, while the other is going to the right, thus conflicting with each other.

Not marketing to an identified target market is like having a multi-balloon powered rocket.  Your forces are conflicting with each other.

You need to take a more focused approach.

Marketing to an identified target market is like having a single-balloon powered rocket.  Because of its focused energy it wins, every time.  A focused marketing campaign will yield far better results than by just casting a net out and seeing what you catch.

Here are three quick questions we were asked to help us start to identify our target market.

Where are they located?

Get as specific as possible.  I have known some companies to target right down to a specific street. Not everyone has those capabilities, but see if you can break it down to a suburb or city area.

How long have they been in business?

Some businesses avoid start-ups whilst others specialise in new business ventures.

Can they use your product?

There are some businesses that SiteZero don't work with because the functionality of our software doesn’t meet their requirements. What kinds of business don’t suit your product functionality, or particular service?

The answers to these questions can also be used to focus the energy of your website to ensure your a race winner.  

To find out how to improve your online marketing , talk to one of our experts,  contact SiteZero today.

Richard NorrisAbout the Author : Richard Norris.

Richard  is the CEO of SiteZero , an Australian based Digital Marketing Services organization.
Richard loves technology and is the Ecommerce evangelist at SiteZero.
You can connect with Richard on Google + , Linkedin  or at the SiteZero Facebook Page

Richard Started his first Business in 1985 and entered the online world in 1998.
He’s a bit like “The old man and the sea” of digital Marketing
Richard Norris  |  Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Google Plus

Web Design Trends for 2012

Posted: Monday, April 15, 2013 at 2:27:36 PM EST by Richard Norris

As time moves on with new ways of communicating, visual messages within Web Design evolve ever so quickly along with it. One of the most important aspects of Web Design is keeping a website visually appealing with your visual messages still communicating successfully. Here are a few trends we may see in the years to come which may give you a leg up, essentially separating your website from the rest of the competition out there on the web.

Typography

Although typography has always been at the forefront of almost every great design (if used correctly), when it comes to Web Design the amount of creative freedom is of somewhat a blessing. Typography is defined as the art, craft or process of composing type. It is an innovative tool to really communicate a message effectively to your audience. Whether it comes down to combing two separate fonts, tweaking shapes of letters, stylising a header or even turning a piece of text into an art piece; the message you are trying to communicate will be received by many audiences successfully.

Vintage

It seems as though Vintage styles have always played a part in contemporary design, whether as forms of inspiration or perhaps the design elements themselves. However it can prove to become a classy and stylish method to really make your website pop! The use of vintage styles is not merely manipulated to bring audiences a flashback of nostalgia, but combining the old, with the new can produce some very effective visual designs.

backinthe80s

While some people may love, or want to forget the 80’s, there is no ignoring the extreme potential from the colour pallet used in the decade. The vibrant use of electro infused colours blended with big, bold and quirky font was, and still is, an effective method up until this day. Here are some examples of this design trend.

80s_image1 80s_image2

 

warposters

From a typographical sense a lot of inspiration for bold messages comes from fonts and type methods used from old War Posters. These posters were mainly utilized for recruiting soldiers back in World War I & II. They used fully saturated colours, vintage illustrations and bold, spaced text to make the message attentive and crystal clear. Today, we see much of the same techniques used through a marketing perspective on many forms of media. Fonts and colours back in this era have been re-created today to help communicate a message clearly and effectively. Here are some examples of the war design trend.

warposter_1 warposter_2

Light Websites

If there is something in common with most of the world’s leading websites (Google, Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn) other than a fighting battle with the PIPA and SOPA antipiracy bills, is that they all use light colour schemes throughout their website templates. Small use of a dominant and strong colour with various mixes of faint colours can often give a website a sense of class and warmth. It gives the overall online presence a feel of purity and reliability. It’s not an emotion we register knowingly; it’s just one of the many automatic brain reactions to how we feel when we are exposed to certain colours. Dark websites, although visually appealing, are mostly used for more masculine and bold references and companies.

Whitespace

Another strong method used is Whitespace. Originally whitespace was a method only used in publications, more specifically magazine articles and business cards. However we can see many design methods, intended for publications, making the change into the online world as our web building languages are becoming more advanced. Whitespace is mainly used as a tool to direct the eyes to a certain focal point (e.g. a sales message). It is also a great way to simplify a website aesthetically. It can overall improve functionality and reduce clutter to the online presence.

Of course, depending on the certain kind of designer, trends will differ depending on their utilised methods. However, this is simply a helpful guide for you to get your website up to scratch with the rest of the online world in 2012. Web Design, just like any other form of Design, is changing every single day. Best not to get yourself too behind.I would love to discuss any design questions or thoughts you may have. So please leave a comment below or contact me via the SiteZero website.

 

Richard NorrisAbout the Author : Richard Norris.

Richard  is the CEO of SiteZero , an Australian based Digital Marketing Services organization.
Richard loves technology and is the Ecommerce evangelist at SiteZero.
You can connect with Richard on Google + , Linkedin  or at the SiteZero Facebook Page

Richard Started his first Business in 1985 and entered the online world in 1998.
He’s a bit like “The old man and the sea” of digital Marketing
Richard Norris  |  Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Google Plus
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Images for Inspiration, Content Marketing, Being Social and Infographics

Posted: Wednesday, March 6, 2013 at 10:02:42 AM EST by

Link Round Up 19th January, 2012.

Welcome to the first installment of a weekly "round up". We want to share five links every week that are interesting to people who do business via the web.

To share your opinions, ask questions, or relate war stories, please leave a comment below! We'd love to hear them.

sitezero-smiley-face

Cool Images

Lets face it, some sweet graphics on your website can make a world of difference. It can reinforce your branding, attract people to dig deeper on your site, and even aid with navigation. The link above is some of the cool photographs and images that have inspired us in recent weeks.

Fair Use vs Copyright - a practical guide

Seth Godin writes why Fair Use is an important legal principle, and gives some practical advice on how to leverage it. As mentioned above, graphics above are important; Seth gives some pointers on how and when (and when not to) to use other peoples images and photographs.

Is Content Marketing is for Real?

Well, it sure is for real when Coca Cola remake their entire marketing plan around content marketing. This is indicitive of a shift that has been happening for years - the importance of television is declining, and the web is where people are found now.

Ranking in Search Engines now means being Social

Still trying to figure out why this whole Social Media thing is important for your business? The folks at Bing (yes, the other big search engine) give some straight up advice on why and how it works, and what you can do to get involved.

The Importance of Quality Score in your AdWords campaign

If you are running a Google AdWords campaign, understanding what Quality Score is all about is essential. Get the low down on this complex metric through this easy to understand infographic.


Stephen Hamilton is a Search Engine Marketing Consultant at SiteZero.

Tips for Web Design - Planning Website Navigation

Posted: Monday, April 15, 2013 at 2:25:54 PM EST by Richard Norris

istock_000013921412medium

Making the path easy to follow.

Many people underestimate the importance of correctly planning website navigation. They go about aimlessly grouping and lining pages without much care and then send their website live.

This method is wild, frivolous and you have a low chance of obtaining quality conversions.

The method to obtain the best result is planning.

Through planning you can create an easy to follow navigation system that both your visitors and Google can trek through to find exactly what they are after.

Run your website navigation through the burner of these following processes and ensure your website navigation is easy to follow.

1. List Your Pages…All of Them.

Make a list of every single page that you want on your website. This presents you with a perfect opportunity to add/remove pages on your website. Add pages that you want that aren’t on your website and remove pages from the list that you don’t want on your website.

Don’t focus on how they will map out on your website yet, just focus on getting all the pages that you want in a list.

All of these pages should have a corresponding keyword. If not, pour yourself a glass of a good red and settle in for a couple of hours of keyword research and assign keywords to all your pages.

2. Work Your Way Up.

Now that you have your list of pages, place these pages into very strict groups. If you have 20 pages it would be better to have 15 groups with 1 or 2 pages in each group than have 3 groups with 8-10 pages in each group.

Then, group the groups. What you are doing is creating the framework of your website navigation from the bottom. For typical websites you will end up with two categories (probably products and services) that you can now include in your website navigation menu.

Tip: Write all your pages down on post-it notes and use an empty table as your canvas. This way you can easily shift and move the pages around your navigation framework.

3. It’s Not About You.

Your website is not about you, or your business.

It’s actually about your visitors and the search engines. You need to create an environment for both to frolic and flow with ease through your website, so that they can pick up, read and scan all the bits of information that they want in as little time as possible.

Here’s the irony. The easier you make your website navigation, helping visitors spend less time finding what they want, the longer those visitors will spend on your website!

Research the type of people that are coming to your website. Test various linking methods. Have links in side columns, as buttons and images of products. Test all of these methods and see what is better suited to your main type of visitor.

4. Make Room to Grow

The search engines love websites that are updated regularly. So do people. How boring is it to be stuck in traffic behind the same car with the same annoying kid in the backseat pulling faces at you. Your visitors feel the same way about your website. But unlike the traffic jam your visitors can escape their boredom.

Always be changing your website. Put new content, new images and new videos on your website. But have it coincide with the navigation framework you have just done.

A website is not an event, it’s a journey. Make it a long and prosperous one.

Do you want to ensure that your website navigation covers these four points?
View the range of SiteZero web design solutions today to get your website planned for success.

Richard NorrisAbout the Author : Richard Norris.

Richard  is the CEO of SiteZero , an Australian based Digital Marketing Services organization.
Richard loves technology and is the Ecommerce evangelist at SiteZero.
You can connect with Richard on Google + , Linkedin  or at the SiteZero Facebook Page

Richard Started his first Business in 1985 and entered the online world in 1998.
He’s a bit like “The old man and the sea” of digital Marketing
Richard Norris  |  Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Google Plus
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Website Secrets Part 2

Posted: Monday, April 15, 2013 at 2:25:25 PM EST by Richard Norris

businesswebsitesexposed

At the end of last year I did an exposé on the secrets to a great website.  

One bit of information that I got was just too large to include in my original report.  So without any more hesitation here is the final report on the secrets to having a successful business website.

It is easy to become solely focused on the mechanics of your website.  Logging in, editing a page, uploading photos, changing prices of products, these are all important things, but they are what I call the mechanics. And if you only ever focus on the mechanics then long term success will be elusive.

Does this sound a bit like you? Then follow these simple tips:

1. Step away from the computer – you don’t really need a computer for this exercise, and for most people it will actually hinder you.  Instead, grab a notepad or perhaps a whiteboard and some pens – whatever you find more useful for taking notes.

2. Ideally, you’ll spend some time doing this when you are relaxed, unhurried, and uninterrupted.  If that means closing the door to your office and taking the phone off the hook, or spending 30 minutes by the pool on a Sunday afternoon, then seize the opportunity.

3. Consider these questions, and actually take some time just thinking about them before trying to write down solutions:

a. Why do people do business with me and my company?

b. Why should people do business with me and my company?

c. What problems do I solve for my customer?

d. What questions does my customer have that they need answered before deciding to business with me?

e. How can I share useful information (like these tips!) with my customer?

f. How do I take this and use it to create genuinely useful and interesting material that will attract new clients, and help retain existing clients?

g. Where and when do I share this material with my clients and prospective clients? (Hint: your website is a great place to start!)

4. Hopefully, you’ve got some great ideas, and maybe you’re even a little bit excited by the ideas you have.  Now start writing down what they are, and what format they could take.  By format, I mean deciding if they are going to be one of, or a combination of, the following:

a. A blog post

b. An image gallery

c. A simple video (the new iPhones are a great way to do simple videos)

d. An audio recording of an interview with an industry expert (that might be you!)

e. An ebook

f.  A downloadable list of useful resources or tips

g. A regular email newsletter

h. And many more formats, such as direct mail, catalogues, product information sheets, web-forms to automate common inquiries, etc.

5. Now that you have some specific details written down, start setting aside time to producing this material.  Put some timelines in place, and most importantly, ask for help!  It will make your life easier, and will help make the end product better.

Do you want to know more website secrets?

Contact SiteZero Today.

Richard NorrisAbout the Author : Richard Norris.

Richard  is the CEO of SiteZero , an Australian based Digital Marketing Services organization.
Richard loves technology and is the Ecommerce evangelist at SiteZero.
You can connect with Richard on Google + , Linkedin  or at the SiteZero Facebook Page

Richard Started his first Business in 1985 and entered the online world in 1998.
He’s a bit like “The old man and the sea” of digital Marketing
Richard Norris  |  Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Google Plus
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